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INDIA-L  May 1998, Week 1

INDIA-L May 1998, Week 1

Subject:

India Discussion digest - May. 1,98.

From:

India-D Editor <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

[log in to unmask]

Date:

Fri, 1 May 1998 16:49:26 -0400

Content-Type:

TEXT/PLAIN

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

TEXT/PLAIN (591 lines)

India Discussion Digest     Fri,  1 May 98       Volume 2 : Issue 1647

Today's Topics:

      Advaita Vedanta
      Art and the Artist (part 2)
      A typical IIT response.
      Contribution to country
      Disintegeration of Indian unity.
      IIT "ism" etc.
      IIT-ians deserve better
      IITans contribution
      IITians' contribution to India
      Jana Gana Mana
      Jana Gana Mana Controversy Part II
      Marriage within the extended family and Indian marriage
      Phone Scam
      Procreation and other scientific oddities
      regional parties

*************************************************************************
       I N D I A  N E T W O R K  F O U N D A T I O N, I N C.
       P.O. Box 556, Bowling Green, OH 43402, USA

 *********************************************************************
---------------------------
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----------------------------

Date: Fri, 1 May 1998 22:45:34 +0000 (GMT)
From: "17.12.97" <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Advaita Vedanta

Chandra Nanda's posting on the topic is well taken. Indeed the Vedas are
the oldest. In the book "The Long Pilgrimage" by a white British who is
son in law of the cousin of Lord Minto, it is claimed that there are
enough evidence in the Vedas that they come from the last ICE AGE !
Imagine: A civilization flourished, but died due to the ice age, yet found
a way to pass some of its important achievement out to the future possible
civilazation that is We. That is why it is said that the Vedas were
"Heard", not written or created.  Regarding Buddhism, it is said that the
Shankara was a "Prachchana Bouddha", meaning that Buddhism and Advaita are
not so different. I have tried to achieve a consonence and harmony in me
between Advaita and Buddhism by resolving that Advaita is the best for
intellect, Buddhism is the best for daily living. OM SHANTI. Ratan.

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 29 Apr 1998 04:30:22 -0400 (EDT)
From: "Sujai S. Karampuri" <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Art and the Artist (part 2)

        Why some paintings are considered masterpieces and why they become
costly is very different from Art, and its more to do with people rather
than the artist.  Its almost like selling an underwear of a princess or an
actress for a hundred grand.  Why do people buy it?  Well, its not the
object that they are paying for; but the the person who wore it that
becomes significant.  The same applies to paintings.  There are hundreds
of replicas of Mona Lisa and a common eye would never be able to tell the
difference, but then, they are not painted by Leonardo da Vinci.  As one
can see, its just not the painting, but the Artist.  More over, the
replicas are mere reproductions.  ['Mona Lisa' is a great painting, but
its popularity is another issue.]
        Well, its also true that this zeal to push creativity and to be
different from what others have alreay done has led to some funny and
bizarre pieces of art.  I cannot comment on all of them, since I am not an
expert myself, but definitely, there are some paintings which are like
'Emperors New Clothes'. I was at Museum of Modern Art in Washington, DC,
where I saw a big canvas, all white, not even a speck of other color on
it.  I talked about it with my Art instructor, who is one of the
recognized artists in North America, and even she was unable to appreciate
it.  So it turns out that even present day artists would not approve of
what is being displayed in the museums.  That should explain a lot.  What
is distressing is that many would like to be art-admirers, and be art
critics, resulting in a big pseudo-elite society, and such paintings feed
temperaments of only those.  [Topics like what is Beauty, Truth, Art have
been dealt extensively by many philosophers.  What you find in their books
may sound very idealistic and far from real world. But, there are people
who beleive in those. One can read either Russel,Krishnamurty,Bernard
Shaw,Oscar Wilde,Nietzsche,Voltaire]

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 1 May 98 11:00:39 EDT
From: [log in to unmask]
Subject: A typical IIT response.

A typical IIT'an response
-------------------------

If the term "contributing to the economy" has to be explained to a person
the cause is essentially lost. I think this typifies the response of IIT
students to a certain extent. I think Amol, you are being very vacuous if
you feel that the Tatas have not contributed anything to the economy.  An
explanation of that is not the purpose of this mail. What I would really
like to find out is - is there a guilt complex in IIT'ans on this issue.
Whenever a discussion on this topic is initiated they will come up with
explanations of them contributing through charities and so forth.  Come on
!! HOW MANY PEOPLE DO THIS. I do agree on one point though. IIT graduates
should not be SINGLED out in this. Any person educated in India and who
ends up leaving the country is also responsible. Amol is right. If people
educated in REC's get education comparable to IIT's they will leave too.
So this is not just an IIT phenomenon.  In the present situation, it is
just that the IIT are subsidised the most and the efflux form these
institutions is the most. Does that make any of us less culpable. NO! I
think what could be done about this is - make anyone who leaves India pay
a certain portion of the money spent in educating them. This money in turn
can be used in rural schoools.  Before anyone jumps on me - I agree this
is not perfect. But then which scheme in India is? It is at least a start.
NO one can be expected to sacrifice his PROSPECTS and stay in a work
environmenthe is not comfortable in. That would be expecting mankind to be
selfless and we are certainly not saints. But the least all of us could do
is accept responsibility for a debt and and make amends, NOT BY CHARITY
but make genuine amends. And maybe someone preferably an IIT grad. could
post a reply - a genuine reply - do you not feel more responsible or that
you are running away from something by posting these half-baked ideas?
Kunal.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 30 Apr 1998 18:47:42 -0700
From: Srinivas Murthy <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Contribution to country

Amol Pattekar writes "Look at the Tatas. Everyone says they have
contributed a lot to the country. How ?  They have built several
industries which are major profit centers. How does it help the country ?
These industries provide employment to lots of people. Who keeps the
profit ? The Tatas, *not India*. "

That is a naive statement, to say the least. The Tatas have diversified
into every segment of the market possible and are generating more
employment than any other industrial family. In terms of economy, hundreds
of thousands of Indians get their pay cheques to feed, educate, clothe and
feed the economy in turn. This is a cycle, and you don't need a rocket
scientist to realise that all these activities indeed spur the economy and
the results are there for every one to see. Profit is of course the motive
of any industry, but to be fair to the Tatas, they have had the best
industrial environment and business culture, at least prior to the entry
of multi nationals. They have funded educational institutes, libraries and
have grants that give scholarship to hundreds of students through out the
country. What more would you expect from an industry, other than expecting
them to donate all their profits into charity?  Thomas Alva Edisons and
Watsons did not *need an environment commensurate with their intellect*,
they created it. And they didn't get subsidised education in IITs :-)  The
bottom line is that IITs have contributed next to nothing for India.  One
may speak of NRI IITians generating foreign exchange for the country, but
for your information, the *other* institutes generate far more, probably a
hundred fold more than the IITians.  The noble concept behind the
establishment of these higher centers of learning was that the country
should get something in terms of technological innovations, R & D, and
contribution of the IITians *IN* the country, not foreign exchange. One
could keep arguing with another hundred postings, but the country will
still get nothing from the IITians. Moral of the story is that one doesn't
expect "sacrifices" from the IITians, but they better pay for their
prospects created solely due to the efforts of tax paying Indians.
Srinivas *other institute* Murthy

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 30 Apr 1998 14:42:19 -0700 (PDT)
From: Raj Ponnuraj <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Disintegeration of Indian unity.

This is with regards to Shailendra Mathur's posting.  He raised the
prospect of disintegeration of Indian states into independant pieces.

I would think that the current turmoil in the Indian politics is vastly
misunderstood. Not always are turmoils a problem. When there are several
groups with wide ranging views and preferences, it is understandable to
have such level of instability. A country such as India, will simple adapt
to the fact that we have numerous cultures, several languages and
approaches etc.

I see this as a progress for the Indian politics. From here, the
politicians, the system and the people will gradually learn the work with
the differences and achieve substantial goals despite all the partisan
politics. It is important that a representative from one state does her
best to get the best deal for her state. When all representative try that,
we get a good balance and a useful democracy.  One thing to remember is
that, generally, in democracy, things get done much much slower than any
other system!!! Regards, Raj

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 30 Apr 1998 13:35:18 -0500
From: Sandeep Shouce <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: IIT "ism" etc.

Indians have a tendency to blame everyone around for their problems
without looking inward. This debate about IITians not "contributing "
enough is another example. How are the rest of us here "contributing"
more towards the country than the IITians. Or is contributing to the
country the complete responsibility of IITians alone ??
     The argument that "we pay for their education" is high-handed and
hollow. I do not support the practice of subsidizing professional
education but then IITs are not the only universities that run on
government doles. The University Grants Commission distributes money to
hundreds of other universities all over the country. Why does'nt enyone
check how much they "contribute" ??
     It is true that a large proportion of IITians go abroad. But the
others are equally anxious to go do likewise. I have seen hundreds of
students in universities like Osmania, JNTU or Poona University who fail
their BScs and BComs but assiduously prepare for their GREs and TOEFLs. It
is just that IITians by virtue of their superior qualifications (which are
hard-earned, I may add) have a better chance of realizing their dreams as
compared to students from other universities. So why berate IITians about
their "betrayal" ?? The thousands of people toiling at NIITs and Aptechs
while ignoring their graduate programs would do exactly the same, given
half a chance.
     I am not arguing that everybody should be oppurtunistic and shun the
nation that we came from. All I am saying is that we should be consistent
about our expectations and remember always that charity begins at home.
     Having said that, I do not support the creation of more engineering
colleges on government money. If we already have a huge surplus of
engineers and most have to look to go abroad or do their MBAs and sell
soap or join financial institutions and banks. We have such a tremendous
obsession about the engineering and medical professions that we are blind
to all others.
     It is worth noting that while spectacular advances have been made in
areas such as space exploration and nuclear science, most of our
businesses and industries run on centuries old technology. It is as though
industrial revolution and the information age has simply escaped our
farmers, craftsmen, artisans and businessmen who still use the same tools
as their forefathers; some out of vested interests, but most because of
sheer ignorance. I would rather support the idea of free, compulsory and
universal primary education and make institutions for professional studies
(which essentially enhance the earning power of an individual) fend for
themselves in the market place.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 30 Apr 1998 19:00:10 EDT
From: Chandan97 <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: IIT-ians deserve better

I think that some over-zealous IIT-ians (Anshu Sharma and Amol Pattekar)
have completely missed the point of my original posting ("IITs - Will They
Swim or Sink ?" IDD Fri April 24, 1998).  I wanted to start a healthy
discussion on why should the Indian government continue to fund the IITs
so heavily.  I even praised the IITs by saying that they are "... a fine
institution and one to be proud of as an Indian...."  Does this sound like
IIT bashing ?  Please, we have already had an overdose of these "IITs v/s
non-IITs" discussion a few months back on IDD.  I just hope that we don't
go into it again ! The IDD postings on April 28, 1998 on this subject were
very interesting. Mr.  Kenchammana said " IITs have had over 3 decades of
sheltered growth and have spectacularly fulfilled their initial goals of
creating centers of excellence - they are world renowned institutions
today. Now it is time to rationalize the system with the free market and
given their strong reputation, I think they have a high chance of
succeeding."  Thanks Rajendra for pointing out to Mr. Sharma that "... the
original post deals with a entirely different angle than what you have
mentioned."  Mr. Vaidya thinks that "IITs will swim, but should swim on
their own."  I hope we continue our discussion along these lines.  I agree
with the views expressed above and truly believe that, with or without
government funds, the IITs will survive.  In order to maintain the high
quality of education that they are known for, the IITs will have to
gradually make a move towards privatization.  I hope that this happens
soon.  I for one will whole heartedly applaud this when it happens.  The
IIT-ians around the world deserve better than the lame excuses given by
our over-zealous friends.  Excuses like "if you spend this money on people
from RECs, they will do the same thing" or "IIT-ians, remember less than
2000 per year, have done much more for the country than 100,000 graduates
per year from places like Delhi and Bombay University who also get highly
subsidized education only to bunk classes and become politicians" do
little in justifying why Indian tax-payers should foot the bill for IIT
education. Bhaskar Chandan

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 30 Apr 1998 16:46:20 -0400
From: Dave Mahadevan <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: IITans contribution

Folks:  I agree with Amol that "contribution" is a word which can be
interpreted to mean almost anything.  By following the discussion so far,
it is clear that non-IITians "dislike" IITians and are venting this.
However, IITians and non-IITians are responding to market pressures and
not to any "pure" objective.  As an IITian, I chose my career based on
what is good for me and my family.  If this is wrong, maybe a Chinese
style revolution is in order in India.  As, Indians, we love our culture
and people as much as anybody else.  Investment in education should not be
directly tied to a person's future service.  If you increase the tuition,
only the wealthy can afford good education.  This will directly contribute
(there is that word again) to increasing poverty leading to an endless
cycle and ruin the country's economy.  America was built on the priniciple
of individual freedon and market forces.  Let India do the same and become
equally prosperous. -- Thank You. Regards Dave Mahadevan..
mailto:[log in to unmask]

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 30 Apr 1998 15:58:31 -0400
From: "Vijay R. Anisetti" <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: IITians' contribution to India

This is in response to Amol Pattekar's regarding IITians' contribution to
India:
<<I don't really understand the term "contribute back to the country".
Does that mean that people stay in India and contribute in terms of income
tax ? Or does that mean that people make huge donations to charities ? If
it means the latter, then IITians in the US are doing it.>>
You are wrong to a great extent, how many of the IITians are donating?  It
is ironic to see an IITian to have such a narrow thinking. You can
contribute by working in a company in India with inturn contributes to the
economy of the country. Why the heck you shouldn't be asked to work there?
Govt is spending huge sums of money to further the development of the so
called "intelligent"  people, which very well could've been used for
providing basic education to scores of individuals. It is to be noted that
IITians belong to one
 "frame of intelligence", in a democratic country, people belonging to all
"frames of intelligence" should be treated equally.
<< Will anyone of you "contribute to your country" in a certain way, even
if you know that it is going to result in some personal loss to you ?  If
you won't, then you shouldn't expect an IITian to go back only to
contribute.>>
But lakhs of rupees are not spend on the "other" students by the Govt. I
am not against spending of money to further the development of the so
called "extra-ordinary" students, but they should treat that amount as
loan and pay back to the Govt, if they choose to leave the country,so that
the Govt can put that money to better use.
<< The point that I want to make is that your personal reasons are the
main thing and the contribution is only a positive side-effect.>>
Point well said and I agree with you on this.
<<You can't expect a person with a Masters' degree in CS to work on a Y2K
project.>>
Well, I've seen such people who are writing filthiest of the code, forget
about Y2K.
<<The moral of the story is that don't expect IITians to sacrifice all
their prospects just because at some point of time tax-payer money was
spent on them.>>
 First of all there is moral in it, and secondly, it is "substantial"
amount of money spent at a very "crucial" point in time of the IITian. -Vj

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 30 Apr 1998 23:14:37 +0100 (BST)
From: JAI_HIND <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Jana Gana Mana

Namaste _/I\_

Just a quick note to express my thanks to Shri Sitansu ji Mittra for his
posting of the 2nd stanza of Guru Rabindra Nath ji Thakur's poem, "Jana
Gana Mana", and also the brief comments accompanying it.

Incidentally, again on the topic of the phrase "Snehamayee Toomi Maataa"
in the fourth stanza of the poem, this has been used by various different
people to demonstrate the fact that the poem was clearly not intended for
King George V.  As I described in my previous post, it appears from
studying the entire poem that it was written in glorification of Lord
Vishnu (possibly in the form of Shri Krishna).  It may be asked how one
can use the word "Maataa" in relation to Lord Vishnu.  However, the
conflict is resolved when one recalls the popular verse which begins,
"Tvameva maataa cha pitaa tvameva..." (You alone are the Mother, and you
alone are the Father...).  Also, if I am not mistaken, Lord Vishnu once
took form as a woman (details anyone?) Thanks once again to Shri Sitansu
ji... Namaste JAI HIND !! Manish Tayal

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 28 Apr 1998 14:43:16 -0500
From: Kakoli Bandyopadhyay <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Jana Gana Mana Controversy Part II

It was the natural expectation that this great national anthem (Vande
Mataram)would continue as the official national anthem of India. It was
used in the Constituent assembly, and was sung by Smt. Sucheta Kriplani.
But soon a dis-cordant note began to be heard. Much to the surprise of its
own members, the Constituent assembly deferred the question of adopting
the national anthem again and again. Who were behind the controversy and
what were their motives? The following excerpt from Pt. Nehru's statement
on this issue may provide some clue: "It is unfortunate that some kind of
argument has arisen between VM and Jana. VM is obviously and indisputedly
the premier national song of India, with a great historical tradition and
intimately connected with our struggle for freedom. That position it is
bound to retain and no other song can displace it. It represents the
passion and poignancy of that struggle but perhaps not so much the
culmination of it. In regard to the national anthem tune, it was felt that
the tune was more important than the words, and this tune should be such
as to represent the Indian musical genius as well as to some extent the
Western, so that it might easily be adapted to orchestra and band music,
and to playing abroad. The real significance of the national anthem is
perhaps more abroad than in the home country. Past experience has shown
that Janagana tune has been greatly appreciated and admired abroad...VM
with all its very great attraction and historical background, was not
easily suitable for orchastras in foreign countries.. It seemed therefore
that while VM should continue to be the national song par excellence in
India, the national anthem tune should be that of Janaganamana, and the
wording of Janagana be altered suitably to fit in with existing
circumstances." (Glorious Thoughts of Nehru, p.139) The above rational and
criteria for selecting a national anthem coming from the PM, had shocked
the people of India. These ideas of Nehru's were severly criticised in the
press and in other forums universally. The polls conducted by some
organizations on this issue showed that 95% people favored VM as the
national anthem. "When the objection was raised to the adoption of VM as
the national anthem on the ground that it was full of idolatry, Aurobindo
said Durga to whom it paid homage was none other than Bharata Mata
symbolising Knowledge,Power, Greatness and Glory." (Resurgent India,
p.191)  The charge that VM cannot be set to the tune to suit band and
foreign orchestra was disproved when it was set to melodious tune by an
ace musician Master Krishna Rao, but Nehru ji did not budge. And Dr
Rajendra Prasad who was presiding the Constituent assembly on 24 January
1950 made the following statement which also became the final decision on
this issue:  "The composition consisting of words and music known as
Janaganamana is the National Anthem of India, subject to such alterations
as the Government may authorise as occasion arises, and the song Vande
Mataram, which has played a historic part in the struggle for Indian
freedom, shall be honored equally with Janaganamana and shall have equal
status with it. (Applause) I hope this will satify members." (Constituent
Assembly of India, Vil.XII,24-1-1950)

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 30 Apr 1998 11:12:33 PDT
From: Aa Sagokia <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Marriage within the extended family and Indian marriage

>Date: Tue, 28 Apr 1998 12:26:46 PDT
>From: S Ramani <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: Marrying Cousins
>

>I am always puzzled at the concept of marrying one's first cousins, which
is very common in India. It is more common in South India and to a lesser
extent in the North. In TamilNadu, a person marries his/her Uncle/Aunt's
daughter/son (mostly from mother's side).

I must point out that variants of the system DO EXIST in other parts of
the world also. Among Muslims, it is not uncommon to marry a first cousin
from the father's side( as opposed to mother's side in the South)..one
example I know of here is Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto who married a cousin on his
father's side before marrying Benazir's mother, Nusrat A similar
tradition( to keep family property within and to prevent torture by the
mother-in-law) is prevalent in Nepal where marriages are always exchanges
i.e. the son of family X weds a daughter of family Y, son of family Y weds
a daughter of family X. In Burma, the landed aristocracy had the rule that
only aristocrats could intermarry; it was therefore not unusual to marry
one's half-sister!  I therefore point out that the system is very generic
and occurs even in Europe, though it is not institutionalized like in
India.(As an example, Al Einstein married his cousin after divorcing the
mathematician Mareva?  Milic).
  As far as Shri Shailendra MAthur's complaints about Indian inter-state
relations souring up, I think that despite the relations souring up, India
will still remain one and will follow the same course that many Indian
marriages follow. RElations between the husband and wife may be bitter,
they may not talk to each other for extended periods of time, acrimony is
common; but divorce is taboo and nobody even contemplates separation!
Compare this with the West where the bottom line is to minimize acrimony.
I believe that the country will follow the same course with each member
claiming more importance for himself/herself and a lot of debate/hot air
being generated; but the family, however dysfunctional will not come
apart.  The price to be paid for all the acrimony will be that India can
never advance as fast as envisioned and will remain, as J.K.Galbraith put
it so succintly, "a functioning anarchy". REgards, Sagokia

------------------------------

Date: 30 Apr 1998 11:51:01 -0500
From: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Phone Scam

"I received a telephone call from an individual identifying himself as an
AT&T Service Technician that was running a test on our telephone lines. He
stated that to complete the test we should touch nine (9), zero (0), pound
sign (#) and hang up.  Luckily, we were suspicious and refused.  Upon
contacting the telephone company we were informed that by pushing 90# you
end up giving the individual that called you access to your telephone line
and allows them to place a long distance telephone call, with the charge
appearing on your telephone call.  We were further informed that this scam
has been originating from many of the local jails/prisons. I have verified
with UCB Telecomm. that this actually happens."  Shirish Kulkarni

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 30 Apr 1998 14:19:53 -0700 (PDT)
From: S Narasimhan <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Procreation and other scientific oddities

>Date: Wed, 22 Apr 1998 17:24:21 -0400
>From: "Chandran, Nanda (NBC)" <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: Procreation and other scientific oddities
>Seeing S Narasimhan suggest Western books, I can't but feel regret.
Carl
>Sagan, an authority on Cosmos, declared that the creation theory of the
>Vedas was one of the most realistic and interesting.

Sorry for the late reply to this comment from Nanda Chandran (regular
readers recognise will know that I have been 'soap-boxing' on Art ;-) My
comments on Procreation were very specific in their reference to the
theory of evolution as originally described by Darwin and later modified
by various other scientists. Indian mythology has, very, very indirectly
hinted at the possibility of evolution ... via the Dasavatara where Vishnu
takes on 9 avatars, each one progressively more evolved! Indeed, it is
amazing that Indian mythology and beliefs predated Western thought by so
many centuries! However, the world needed a Darwin to put the thoughts
down in more scientific (or should iut be Western scientific?) terms -
hypothesis, predictions, proof of hypthesis and verification of
predictions which leads us to the 'cause and effect' nature of scientific
thought.

Ancient Indian thought (and writings) is very muddy on this front. It is
probably the lack of proper translations of the texts. Maybe the Sanskrit
is so cryptic that it is almost like reading a mathematical paper - unless
you know the precise meaning of each and everything that is written you
can never know what the author was indicating! In this day and age where
English is the language of choice (among 'intellectuals') and the only
precision available is the scientific methodology - I am forced to use
texts that are easily available, translatable and understandable. Let us
stop basking in the past. India has had her glory days. Let us look at the
present, stop lamenting, and see how we can make a future for India worhty
of her past.  == S Narasimhan All views my own. Anyone else with the same
views needs to have his/her head examined.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 30 Apr 1998 14:57:07 EDT
From: Muthu Vairavan <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: regional parties

Regarding mail from Shailendra Mathur <[log in to unmask]> on
[Is India repeating its own history?], this mail was born.

Please note that I am an Indian and I love India. But, in this paragraph,
I am pretending that today is a day before Aug 15 1947 and that I am a
person who is in a land under British which would be called Tamilnadu in
1967. Here are my thoughts! Current India was NEVER a single country till
British came and brought all kingdoms under its control. May be, if
british had never come, I would have been in the kingdom of Cholas ruled
by a Chola King. Who knows? Yes, I want freedom from British. Yes, I would
like to join a country called India too, but I expect that country to
treat me as equal as any other citizen in that country. If that country
expects me to join that country and does something that gives privileges
to people from other parts, why should I join that country and suffer?
Instead I would prefer to be in a small country which is not annexed with
India. Now, if there are enough people who think similar, why do not we
form our own country, if India gives privileges to others.

Now, I am back to me in 1998. He also says that it was the weakness of
India (having too many kingdoms) that British conquered us. I do not
agree. Let us assume that there are aliens (in outer space) and they come
to earth and conquer us. If we get independence from aliens and if the
earth becomes a single country, would we expect the people from the future
to say that it is the weakness of earth (having too many countries) that
aliens conquered us? What I mean is: We have so many countries in the
world today. Likewise there were so many countries earlier too, some of
which were lying in the same place where India is today.

He is also accusing the regional parties that they do not have any
national issues. No party (whether regional or national) have issues.
Everybody wants power and money. Wheter it is BJP, Congress, Janata Dal,
TDP, DMK, AIADMK, BSP, etc. If regional parties exploit regionally,
national parties exploit nationally!  National parties want power to
humiliate states by dismissing state governments and conducting elections
again and again. It is this attitude which force people like me (who never
supported Jayalalitha)  to turn to her after seeing how a national party
is humiliated by her and still it bows to her. thanks Muthu

------------------------------

End of India Discussion Digest
******************************
****************************************************************************
 Contents Copyright (c) 1998 India Network Foundation, Bowling Green,Ohio.
 All rights reserved. Material may not be
 reproduced or distributed without express written permission of the India
 Network Foundation President, Dr K.V. Rao <[log in to unmask]>
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** the Asian Indian community for the past 10 years. To subscribe to any
* of the free publications, please send note to: [log in to unmask]

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